Quote
"Total abstinence is so excellent a thing that it cannot be carried to too great an extent. In my passion for it I even carry it so far as to totally abstain from total abstinence itself."

— Mark Twain

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vicemag:

An Army of Giant African Pouched Rats Are Clearing Mozambique’s Minefields
Land mines, unexploded artillery shells and cluster munitions are every bit as effective during peacetime as they are during war. An estimated 72 countries around the world are still affected by them, and their proliferation throughout former war-torn countries continues to reaphorrific consequences on rural communities from South East Asia to Angola.
“The socio-economic impact of land mines and unexploded munitions are huge. These things massively block economic development, and poor people in remote areas are continuing to suffer because of them,” says Tekimiti Gilbert, head of mine action for the de-mining NGOApopo.
“The knowledge of a single mine in the area is enough to stop locals using that land out of fear. Most of these communities survive on subsistence farming. They’re dependent on that land for agriculture, animals, and forestry—even getting firewood for their homes. And the further you move out of cities, the greater the land mine problem becomes.”
Fortuitously, Belgian-born Zen Buddhist and founder of Apopo, Bart Weetjens, has pioneered a new approach to detecting and eradicating land mines; he’s using rats—hulking, cat-sized rats who’ll go to insane lengths for a slice of avocado. And who, along with other de-mining NGOs and the British Government, are pushing to make Mozambique a mine-free country by late 2014.
“Some people are thinking of this idea as crazy,” he laughs in a heavy Belgian accent. “But for me, connecting the dots between rats and mine action was an alignment of the constellations.”
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vicemag:

An Army of Giant African Pouched Rats Are Clearing Mozambique’s Minefields

Land mines, unexploded artillery shells and cluster munitions are every bit as effective during peacetime as they are during war. An estimated 72 countries around the world are still affected by them, and their proliferation throughout former war-torn countries continues to reaphorrific consequences on rural communities from South East Asia to Angola.

“The socio-economic impact of land mines and unexploded munitions are huge. These things massively block economic development, and poor people in remote areas are continuing to suffer because of them,” says Tekimiti Gilbert, head of mine action for the de-mining NGOApopo.

“The knowledge of a single mine in the area is enough to stop locals using that land out of fear. Most of these communities survive on subsistence farming. They’re dependent on that land for agriculture, animals, and forestry—even getting firewood for their homes. And the further you move out of cities, the greater the land mine problem becomes.”

Fortuitously, Belgian-born Zen Buddhist and founder of Apopo, Bart Weetjens, has pioneered a new approach to detecting and eradicating land mines; he’s using rats—hulking, cat-sized rats who’ll go to insane lengths for a slice of avocado. And who, along with other de-mining NGOs and the British Government, are pushing to make Mozambique a mine-free country by late 2014.

“Some people are thinking of this idea as crazy,” he laughs in a heavy Belgian accent. “But for me, connecting the dots between rats and mine action was an alignment of the constellations.”

Continue

(via dynamicafrica)

Photoset

dynamicafrica:

"Black man, you are on your own" - Steve Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977).

September 12th, marks the day South Africa anti-Apartheid activist and Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko was killed in police custody in Pretoria. Biko had been arrested a month earlier in Port Elizabeth where he had been detained and tortured, resulting in him falling into a coma.

Nearly dead and suffering a serious and untreated head injury, Biko was transported to Pretoria by car and died shortly after his arrival at the prison there. Police at the time would claim and broadcast to the world that Biko died due to a hunger strike but an autopsy and photographs taken of Biko postmortem, exposed with the help of journalists Donald Woods and Helen Zille, revealed that he had died as a result of the injuries he sustained whilst in police custody.

Today, nearly 40 years after his death at age 30, we remember a man that fought for an end to the brutality he and countless others suffered and still do today. The fight is far from over.

A luta continua!

Quote
"It is better to die for an idea that will live, than to live for an idea that will die."

— Steve Biko

Photo
reuters:

Displaced Iraqi Shi’ite Muslim Mohammed Harith Youssif, 25, walks with his 20-year-old bride Reem Ahmed, a Sunni Muslim, during their wedding at a school in Baghdad, September 1, 2014. The couple married after they fled violence by Islamic State militants in their home town of Mosul. More photos: http://reut.rs/1lzYbaO
REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani 

reuters:

Displaced Iraqi Shi’ite Muslim Mohammed Harith Youssif, 25, walks with his 20-year-old bride Reem Ahmed, a Sunni Muslim, during their wedding at a school in Baghdad, September 1, 2014. The couple married after they fled violence by Islamic State militants in their home town of Mosul. More photos: http://reut.rs/1lzYbaO

REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani 

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newyorker:

Across Silicon Valley, tech workers tend to be disproportionately male. Vauhini Vara examines the trend.

newyorker:

Across Silicon Valley, tech workers tend to be disproportionately male. Vauhini Vara examines the trend.

(Source: newyorker.com)

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Juba - January, 2012

Juba - January, 2012

Photo
guardian:

A second man has been shot by police in the Missouri city where an unarmed black 18-year-old was shot dead last weekend.
Police officials said the man was shot in Ferguson by a St Louis County officer after pointing a handgun at him soon after 1am on Wednesday, following fresh demonstrations over the death on Saturday of Michael Brown. Full story here 
Protesters against the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

guardian:

A second man has been shot by police in the Missouri city where an unarmed black 18-year-old was shot dead last weekend.

Police officials said the man was shot in Ferguson by a St Louis County officer after pointing a handgun at him soon after 1am on Wednesday, following fresh demonstrations over the death on Saturday of Michael Brown. Full story here 

Protesters against the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

(Source: theguardian.com)

Photo
guardian:

Working on the fringes of the law, rebel architects are trying to improve people’s lives in tough areas. From floating homes to disaster-proof houses and bamboo domes, meet the men and women building for their communities.
The structure above is being built in the waterside slum of Makoko, Nigeria. It’s floating school, designed by Kunlé Adeyemi to address the difficulty of building on unstable marshland.
• Rebel architects: building a better world - read more

guardian:

Working on the fringes of the law, rebel architects are trying to improve people’s lives in tough areas. From floating homes to disaster-proof houses and bamboo domes, meet the men and women building for their communities.

The structure above is being built in the waterside slum of Makoko, Nigeria. It’s floating school, designed by Kunlé Adeyemi to address the difficulty of building on unstable marshland.

Rebel architects: building a better world - read more

(Source: theguardian.com)

Photoset

Shoot the moon

Supermoon.

Credits on photos. 

(Source: theguardian.com, via guardian)